NHS will offer mothers the same named midwife until birth

By | May 6, 2019

NHS will offer mothers the same named midwife until birth in a plan to halve maternity deaths by 2025

  • The NHS is doubling funding to £40 million this year for its maternity services 
  • As a result, mothers are to be offered midwife to guide them through pregnancy  
  • It is making the move in an effort to halve maternity deaths by the year 2025 

Thousands of expectant mothers will be offered a named midwife to guide them through their pregnancy in a move which aims to halve maternity deaths by 2025.

The NHS announced yesterday it was doubling funding to £40 million this year for maternity services.

As a result of this funding, expectant mothers can expect top access the same team of midwives throughout their pregnancy and after the birth of their child, The Daily Telegraph reports.

Thousands of expectant mothers will be offered a named midwife to guide them through their pregnancy in a move which aims to halve maternity deaths by 2025. Stock image

Thousands of expectant mothers will be offered a named midwife to guide them through their pregnancy in a move which aims to halve maternity deaths by 2025. Stock image

The average expectant mother will have nine or 10 antenatal appointments and it is currently not uncommon to see a different midwife at each one.

Many new mothers are then given another different midwife post-partum.

It is hoped that by bringing in continuity of care, women will not have to repeat their stories or medical history every time they have an appointment, some of which could be upsetting or personal.

By March next year over a third of expectant mothers should benefit from the plans.

Women and unborn children with complex medical needs or from disadvantage will take priority.

For these groups, evidence has shown that a long-lasting relationship with a midwife can reduce premature births and the need for medical intervention during labour.

The number will rise to cover more than half of all expectant mothers by 2021.

This comes after former health secretary Jeremy Hunt last year pledged to provide continuity of maternity care to reduce risk of neonatal deaths, still births and miscarriages and ‘the agony that comes with these tragedies.’ 

Professor Jacqueline Dunkley-Bent, the first chief midwifery officer for the NHS, said: ‘The NHS long-term plan sets out an ambition to give every child the best start in life, beginning at conception, and this extra investment in midwives to enhance the care they can provide to mothers is central.’ 

Midwifery is an expanding profession in the NHS and the number of full-time midwives in NHS hospitals has grown by 3,000 in the last decade – a 16 per cent increase.

Campaigns to encourage former midwives back into work have also been rolled out.

Health News | Mail Online